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Show Summary
Summary

Early Shep; Granite Knee
Airdate: Sunday - June 16, 1957

WOR Show
Original Airing

Show Description
"Excelsior" Keep your eye on the subject. Let's all honor knees. I'm here and you're there. 3rd Grade and knee dadeling Shep is disappointed Protective Coloration The Status Symbol of Ice
Fan Description
[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Minnie ("Aunt Min") Heinrichs (1905-1963): She took Shep to see "The Student Prince"; featured in classic radio episode "Aunt Min's Surprise"; and thought Shep loved licorice (IGWT). Married to Carl Theodore ("Uncle Carl") Peterson (1904-?), who was a carpenter and painter that predeceased her. Uncle Carl ran a fireworks stand in the PBS movie "Great American Fourth of July and Other Disasters." And in IGWT, Shep told Junie Jo Prewitt of the time Uncle Carl lost his false teeth down the airshaft. Aunt Min and Uncle Carl had Lyle C. (1928-?) and Norman (1936-?).

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Kathryn Edith ("Aunt Kate") Heinrichs (1896-1989): Married to Alfred August ("Uncle Al") Von Beulwitz (1895-1968), who worked as a musician (violinist) and orchestra leader. They had Joyce Gloria (m. Jerome Albert De Berthier) (1920-2006), Arline (aka Arlene) Hope (m. Willis L. Bennett) (1922-?) and Alfred August Jr. (1923-1992). Sisters Kate and Theresa Heinrichs married the Von Beulwitz brothers, Shep's uncles Al and Fred. In a 1962 radio broadcast, Shep told of Aunt Kate and Uncle Al, and how they ordered takeout food.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Glenna L. ("Aunt Glenn") Shepherd (1885-1953): Aunt Glenn gave Shep a giant tie in 8th grade (IGWT), and she bestowed the name "Jean" on Shep's father, according to several radio broadcasts. Married to Thomas John ("Uncle Tom") Manning (1884-1966), who held various odd jobs. They both had Easter dinner at Shep's, where the Bumpus hounds grabbed the ham, and Uncle Tom always gave Shep a dollar ( Wanda Hickey's Night of Golden Memories; Shep's Army).

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Theresa Marie ("Aunt Theresa") Heinrichs (1894-1993): Married to Frederick Frank Herman ("Uncle Fred") Von Beulwitz (1894-1969), who worked as a machinist. They had Warren Parker (1921-1930) and Donald Frederick (1927-2003). Curiously, Shep (as well as his father, of course) has the same middle name ("Parker") as cousin Warren Von Beulwitz. It is also the surname of Shep's fictional family in "A Christmas Story." In a 1960 radio broadcast, Shep mentioned Aunt Theresa's Jell-O molds and Uncle Fred being henpecked.

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Clara M. ("Aunt Clara") Heinrichs (1902-1987): She gave Shep the pink bunny suit in "A Christmas Story." Married to Charles Michael ("Uncle Charles") Musson (1904-1937), who worked in a dye house. Shep wrote in IGWT, when telling of Ralphie's visit to Toyland at Goldblatt's, that "Santa smoked Camels, like my Uncle Charles." Aunt Clara and Uncle Charles had Merle C. (m. Pearson) (1924-2013), Charles August (1927-1990) and Patricia A. (m. Charles Schmidt) (1935-2015).

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Glenna L. ("Aunt Glenn") Shepherd (1885-1953): Aunt Glenn gave Shep a giant tie in 8th grade (IGWT), and she bestowed the name "Jean" on Shep's father, according to several radio broadcasts. Married to Thomas John ("Uncle Tom") Manning (1884-1966), who held various odd jobs. They both had Easter dinner at Shep's, where the Bumpus hounds grabbed the ham, and Uncle Tom always gave Shep a dollar ( Wanda Hickey's Night of Golden Memories; Shep's Army).

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Jack Noble "Jackie" Flickinger -- born in Indiana on March 13, 1921, to Noble O. and Martha Flickinger -- was raised at 3024 (formerly 1482) Cleveland Street, near Shep's house, in the Hessville section of Hammond. He attended local schools, leaving Hammond High one year prior to graduation. His father was the owner of Flick's Tavern at 6449 Kennedy Avenue, which his mother helped manage. After leaving school, Jackie worked as a driver for the Hammond Times. On November 11, 1942, he enlisted in the Army and, after completing basic training in Texas, was sent to North Africa for anti-aircraft duty. After his discharge on October 30, 1945, Jackie returned to Hammond, where he married Opal J. Hayden and tended bar at Flick's. Noble died suddenly in 1950, and Jackie took over his father's tavern, which he ran with Opal for 30 years. They also moved to 3016 Cleveland Street, to be near his widowed mother, and raised two daughters (Jackie and Jean). Jackie and Opal later moved to Lowell, Indiana (446 Lakeview Court), where he passed away on July 21, 1994. Opal survived until August 31, 2008. [12/1/2017] Although Flick went through Hammond's schools with Shep for many years, he dropped out of Hammond High in his junior year. By A year after Shep graduated, Flick was driving a truck for The Hammond Times, delivering the papers right off the presses to the newsboys in the streets of Hammond. In the fall of that year, the Sunday Times included a photo spread about the whole process of printing and delivering the newspapers. (see photo below)

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Gilbert George ("Gil") Galambus was born on March 22, 1898, in Murray City, Ohio, but spent most of his life in Indiana, living in Hammond -- including at 6830 California and 6713 Arkansas avenues -- while Shep was growing up there. Gil worked as a technical designer for his entire career at Inland Steel and Youngstown Sheet and Tube, from which he retired in 1964 as a supervisor. He married Florence Gertrude Pruss on April 26, 1919, and raised three children, including Raymond George ("Ray") Galambus, who attended Hammond High with Shep. Gil passed away at age 97 on February 2, 1996, in Portage, Indiana. Gil's passion was ham radio, and he was one of the best-known amateur-radio stations in northwest Indiana for many years. He operated with the call W9JZA from 1932 until his death. It was at Gil's house that Shep first spoke with someone -- W9PLW (Roy in nearby Gary, Indiana) -- using ham radio. Shep sometimes spoke of how Gil was instrumental in his becoming a ham-radio operator, including on his WOR radio broadcasts of January 24, 1963, January 6, 1965, and May 1, 1968 .

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Clara M. ("Aunt Clara") Heinrichs (1902-1987): She gave Shep the pink bunny suit in "A Christmas Story." Married to Charles Michael ("Uncle Charles") Musson (1904-1937), who worked in a dye house. Shep wrote in IGWT, when telling of Ralphie's visit to Toyland at Goldblatt's, that "Santa smoked Camels, like my Uncle Charles." Aunt Clara and Uncle Charles had Merle C. (m. Pearson) (1924-2013), Charles August (1927-1990) and Patricia A. (m. Charles Schmidt) (1935-2015).

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Theresa Marie ("Aunt Theresa") Heinrichs (1894-1993): Married to Frederick Frank Herman ("Uncle Fred") Von Beulwitz (1894-1969), who worked as a machinist. They had Warren Parker (1921-1930) and Donald Frederick (1927-2003). Curiously, Shep (as well as his father, of course) has the same middle name ("Parker") as cousin Warren Von Beulwitz. It is also the surname of Shep's fictional family in "A Christmas Story." In a 1960 radio broadcast, Shep mentioned Aunt Theresa's Jell-O molds and Uncle Fred being henpecked.

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Clara M. ("Aunt Clara") Heinrichs (1902-1987): She gave Shep the pink bunny suit in "A Christmas Story." Married to Charles Michael ("Uncle Charles") Musson (1904-1937), who worked in a dye house. Shep wrote in IGWT, when telling of Ralphie's visit to Toyland at Goldblatt's, that "Santa smoked Camels, like my Uncle Charles." Aunt Clara and Uncle Charles had Merle C. (m. Pearson) (1924-2013), Charles August (1927-1990) and Patricia A. (m. Charles Schmidt) (1935-2015).

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Evelyn M. Bonar was born on November 12, 1907, in Hammond to Joseph and Margaret Bonar. She graduated from Hammond High and Ball Teachers College (Muncie, Indiana). She first joined the faculty of Lafayette School in Hammond, before transferring to Harding School in 1928/1929. On November 28, 1935, she married Elmer A. Hartfield in Hammond, and moved to Michigan City, Indiana, after resigning from Harding. She later taught at various schools, including 20 years at Long Beach (Indiana) School, from which she retired. She died in New Carlisle, Indiana, on September 26, 2007, less than two months shy of her 100th birthday.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Alice Rebecca Bailey (nee Baird) -- born on March 3, 1902, in Vermillion County, Illinois, to Samuel J. Baird and Etta E. Neldon -- was raised in Caitlin, Illinois, and Worth, Indiana, where her family farmed. Upon obtaining her teaching degree, Alice on November 17, 1923, married Albert Russell Bailey, then a student teacher, and settled in Hammond on Jefferson Street. Albert was on the faculty of Woodrow Wilson School and Alice taught several different grades at Morton School. They were both active in the affairs of the Hyde Park Methodist Church. Alice later retired to Bradenton, Florida, where she passed away on February 20, 1982.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] John Stanley "Johnny" Anderson -- son of John E. and Beda Klarin Anderson, natives of Sweden -- was born on July 19, 1918, in East Chicago, Indiana. He grew up at 6813 (formerly 1439) Arizona Avenue in Hammond, and graduated from Hammond High School a couple of years ahead of Shep. In his WOR broadcast of January 24, 1973, Shep told of how Johnny was an expert ham who was way ahead of the other kids in town, and how he first saw television demonstrated by Johnny in his basement. Johnny in fact held amateur radio license W9YEI at the time. After graduation from Hammond High, Johnny went to work as a chemist at the local steel mill. On April 11, 1941, Johnny enlisted at Fort Benjamin Harrison in the U.S. Army, serving through WWII until November 27, 1945. On June 4, 1955, he married Jane H. Vanstone. Johnny later moved to Munster, Indiana, and continued working at Inland Steel, where he held a variety of technical positions. He passed away on January 29, 1984, at the emergency room of Hammond's St. Margaret Hospital after suffering from neurogenic shock. At the time of his death, Johnny was an electrical technician at Inland Steel's quality control center. He was buried at Elmwood Cemetery in Hammond.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Delbert Norman Bumpus -- born on March 17, 1922, in Centralia, Illinois, to Roscoe Delbert Bumpus and Jennie Ethel (nee Wininger) Bumpus -- spent much of his youth in the Hessville section of Hammond. He lived at 1566 School Street in the early 1930s, moving to 6716 Carolina Avenue by 1935. In about 1939, Delbert and his family left Hammond, moving to Mt. Vernon, Illinois. Delbert's father, Roscoe (an Illinois native, but briefly employed in Arkansas during WWI), worked at several jobs to provide for his family during the Depression. He was an inspector at a lead company, a cook, and an insurance salesman. Delbert's father also kept several beagles confined in a kennel for occasional sale to hunters. Sometimes Roscoe hunted small game, such as rabbit, to put meat on the table for Jennie and their five children. Delbert, as well as some of his siblings (Doris Lee and Floyd), attended Hammond's schools along with Shep. By all accounts, Delbert was popular and a good student. He was elected vice president of the student council at Morton Junior High School, where he earned a place on the honor roll. He sang baritone in the school choir. In addition, Delbert belonged to Boy Scout Troop 43, along with Shep confederates Ray Galambus and Alex Josway, with whom Delbert played baseball on the troop's team. He also played second base for the Tech Tigers in Hammond's Junior Baseball League. By high school, Delbert was playing saxophone in the school band. After moving to Mount Vernon with his family in his junior year, Delbert finished high school in the Illinois town and obtained work at a local stove foundry. But war broke out, and on October 6, 1942, he was inducted into the Army as a private, being sent to Camp Bowie, Texas, for basic training. It was there that he married his pretty hometown sweetheart, Roberta Florence Smith, on July 6, 1943. Roberta had traveled from Mount Vernon as she approached her eighteenth birthday to become Delbert's bride, before he was sent overseas. The following month, Delbert -- as a member of the newly formed 745th Tank Battalion -- was sent to England aboard the liner Queen Elizabeth, converted to troopship duty during the war. Delbert spent much of his time in England at Swindon, where the 745th trained for an amphibious assault that was sure to come. In April 1944, the battalion was attached to the 1st Infantry Division, also known as the "Big Red One." In early June, the 745th moved from its marshaling area at Weymouth, England, to board embarkation craft for the impending invasion. On June 6, 1944 -- D-Day -- Private First Class Delbert N. Bumpus was ferried across the English Channel as a tank crewman in Company B of the 745th. Its destination was Easy Red Sector on Omaha Beach in Normandy, France. Delbert's company was one of the first of the battalion to be put ashore on Omaha Beach. Delbert and his tank were in the second wave, which landed at about 3:00 pm on that historic day. Many of the tanks sank under their own weight, drowning men and equipment alike. Delbert and his tank survived the landing. His tank commander, however, was the battalion's first casualty after hitting the beach, killed instantly by a shell to the head. Under fire, Delbert was asked to take command, being promoted to sergeant on the spot. He and his tank successfully made it off the beach. With Omaha Beach behind him, Delbert spent the summer of 1944 fighting his way through the hedgerows and villages of the French countryside. At one point, while commanding his tank, he was struck in the head by an enemy shell, his dented helmet having deflected the deadly metal. On other occasions, Delbert -- at great risk to his personal safety -- maneuvered his tank under enemy artillery and aircraft fire, protecting the lives of his crew. For his heroism under fire in Normandy, Sergeant Bumpus was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for valor. As the 745th Tank Battalion approached the Siegfried Line in Germany in fall 1944, Delbert came down with pneumonia and severe exhaustion. He was evacuated from the front, eventually being sent to the States for medical treatment. For him, the war was over. On April 30, 1945, Delbert was given a medical discharge for disability. Like many men who saw too much of war, he left the service a different man than the one who entered. Delbert had a sometimes difficult time adjusting back in the States. He would wake in the middle of the night at the sound of planes flying overhead, believing they were bombers attacking his home and loved ones, whom he would rush to protect in the darkness. In today's medical parlance, he was likely suffering from PTSD. Nevertheless, like so many of his generation, he quietly persevered, providing for wife Roberta and their growing family. Delbert did exceptionally well in a CPA course in St. Louis funded by the GI Bill. However, his silent wartime demons -- including terrible headaches -- were a frequent presence. He held a succession of postwar jobs, sometimes with family members, finally moving to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, in 1959. There, Delbert eventually found a way again to serve his country. He became a master welder at the U.S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory Test Facility, where advanced munitions and underwater mines were developed. He received an official commendation for some of his innovations. Although he found much satisfaction in the work, Delbert was forced to retire in 1972 because of a serious neck injury. He and Roberta remained in Fort Lauderdale until 1981, when they moved to Vero Beach; in 2004, they moved to Ocala, Florida. Delbert Norman Bumpus passed away on January 4, 2009, in Ocala, with wife Roberta and eldest daughter Nancy at his side. Twelve days later he received full military honors at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell, Florida. In addition to exemplary service to his country, a loving wife, and five children, Delbert Bumpus left a legacy of nineteen grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. He was truly a member of "the Greatest Generation." Loving wife Roberta followed Delbert on December 22, 2016.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] "Miss Miriam L. Bundy -- born in Illinois in about 1902 -- attended Chicago Normal College (now Chicago State University), graduating in about 1924. She taught for many years at Paul Revere Elementary School on Chicago's South Side at 7145 Ellis Avenue, not far from where she lived. Miss Bundy was still teaching at Revere as of 1957."

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] George Edward Doppler -- born on December 7, 1919, in Indiana to Joseph K. and Alice Saluski Doppler, then of Lake County's Twin Cities -- moved to 236 Clinton Street in Hessville in 1935. Joseph Doppler was a leading contractor, who constructed many of the area's prominent buildings. George had four sisters (Margaret, Laura, Irene and Phyllis) and one brother (Francis). George left high school in his second year. On May 28, 1943, George Doppler enlisted at Indianapolis in the Navy, and that September boarded the USS Richmond (CL-9), a light cruiser, where he served most of the war. When he joined the Richmond, it was being overhauled in California, and then sailed for Kiska in the Aleutian Islands. Through the remainder of the year, Richmond conducted patrols to the west of the outer Aleutians. On February 4, 1944, she began bombardment missions in the Kuriles off the northern coast of Japan, which continued, alternated with antishipping sweeps, for the remainder of the war. With the end of hostilities, Richmond covered the occupation of northern Japan. On September 14, 1945, Richmond departed for Pearl Harbor, where she was routed on to Philadelphia for deactivation. On November 2, 1945, Seaman First Class Doppler left the Richmond, and married Bernice H. Doppler on November 21, 1945, in Hammond, where they raised four children (Judith, James, Diane, and Kathy). George was employed as a pipe fitter at Standard Oil, and later retired from Amoco Oil after 38 years of service. He passed away on September 24, 1996. His wife Bernice was living in Whiting, Indiana, until she passed away on January 17, 2017.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Ernest Walter Dunker -- born on August 31, 1921, in Dolton, Illinois, to William Dunker and Eleanor C. Strassenberg -- was raised at 4828 (formerly 398) Hickory Street in Hammond. He attended Washington Irving Elementary School and Hammond High School. Dunker acted in school plays and held parties for friends, as well as boxed at a local athletic club. He graduated from Hammond High with Shep in June 1939. By 1943, Dunker was working as an electrician in Hammond, and helping to support his divorced mother, with whom he then lived. On September 8, 1943, he enlisted in the Army at Indianapolis. Within a year, Corporal Dunker completed his basic and advanced training, including obtaining his silver gunner's wings at Yuma (Arizona) Army Airfield in September 1944. In the harsh British winter of 1944/1945, Sergeant Ernest W. Dunker was stationed with the 422nd Squadron, 305th Bombardment Group (H), 8th Army Air Force, at Chelveston, England (AAF Station 105). On the morning of February 15, 1945, Sergeant Dunker was flying as radio operator among the nine-man crew of a B-17G Flying Fortress destined for a bombing run over Dresden, Germany. As the first fifteen planes of the group took off, the weather grew steadily worse. By the time it was Dunker's turn to take off, there was near zero visibility through the icy fog in the English countryside. Although his B-17 left the ground with a full bomb load, it barely left the runway before it fell back to earth and caught fire, killing Sergeant Dunker and four of his fellow crewmen, while injuring the remainder. Some of the men in the barracks at the airfield were also killed or injured. Nevertheless, the rapid response by the officers on the ground limited the damage that could have occurred from the burning plane and its bomb load. Although few details were provided, Sergeant Dunker's mother was notified of her son's death several weeks later back home, where it was reported in the Hammond Times on March 22, 1945.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Mrs. Marie Easter (nee Hansen) -- born in Indiana of Danish parents -- was the first librarian at Hammond's newly created public library in 1904. In 1907, as Marie Hansen, she left to attend graduate library school at the University of Wisconsin. She didn't return to Hammond's library system until 1919, as the wife of Howard B. Easter, a contractor. They resided at 6822 Alabama Avenue in the 1930s. One of Hammond's branch libraries was named after Mrs. Easter ("Hansen Branch"), where she presided while Shep was attending school. Mrs. Easter was honored on the floor of Congress in 2003 in a speech given by Congressman Peter J. Visclosky (D-IN 1st CD) on the occasion of the centennial of the Hammond Public Library, when mention was made of Ms. Marie Hansen as Hammond's first librarian.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Claude Roy Eaton -- born on September 12, 1920, in Whiting, Indiana, to Verne H. and Viola Eaton -- was raised in Hammond at 6712 Arizona Avenue. After graduating from the local schools, he took a job in the steel mills, like his father. On October 13, 1942, Claude was inducted into the Army at Indianapolis, leaving for basic training shortly thereafter. On August 5, 1943, while on leave, he married Anna Mae Reder of Griffith, Indiana, and returned to duty. In January 1946, Claude returned from France as a staff sergeant, and resumed working at Inland Steel in East Chicago, while living in Hammond at the family home. He passed away in Hammond on March 2, 2000, and is buried in Schererville, Indiana. [Steve Glazer]

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Born in Rhode Island on June 21, 1923, young Edwards grew up in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. Edwards was a bright student at Saint Bernard's, a private school, earning high marks and serving on the school's debate team. He also participated in various patriotic organizations, as did his father. His father was a newspaper foreman and WWI veteran who served in Pershing's American Expeditionary Force. Edwards enlisted in the Army in Boston on June 26, 1942 -- giving his civilian occupation as "actor" -- after having completed one year of college. In April 1943, Edwards was enrolled in a specialized course at the U.S. Army Signal Corps school at Camp Murphy, Florida, where he almost certainly came in contact with Shep, giving rise to the later Army stories about "Roswell T. Edwards." By October 1943, Edwards was transferred to the Army Specialized Training Program at the University of Maryland, College Park. In September 1945, just weeks after the Japanese surrender, Edwards was with the occupation forces in Tokyo, after serving in the Philippines earlier that year. After the war, Edwards attended Middlebury College, where he was again a member of the debate team and was a fraternity brother of Alpha Sigma Phi. He majored in Russian, and graduated in 1949, declaring an interest in publishing in Manhattan. Not long after, he made his way to New York City, but became an insurance agent. As of the 1990s, Edwards was living in the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Robert "Bob" Wickliff Twyman -- born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, to Allen P. and Agnes M. Twyman on January 31, 1919 -- lived in East Chicago, Indiana, as of 1920. He graduated from Roosevelt High School in East Chicago in 1936. In high school, "Bob" Twyman was very involved in school activities: he was president of Roosevelt's chapter of the National Honor Society; he formed the Junior Academy of Science Club, serving as its first president; he sang in the school's choir; and acted in the class play, playing "Mr. Know-it-all." He also served as chairman of the class-motto committee, which selected "Success, Nothing Less is Our Goal." Twyman attended Indiana University, graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1940 with a degree in sociology. At Indiana, among many other activities, he served as business manager for the class yearbook. Twyman subsequently obtained his doctorate, and joined the faculty of Bowling Green State University, where he became chairman of its history department. Bob Twyman married Edith Anders, and died in Bowling Green, Ohio, on September 20, 2001.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Thomas Andrew "Tommy" Van Hoose -- son of McClellan ("Mack") and May Morris Van Hoose -- was born in East Chicago, Indiana, on March 13, 1925. In about 1935, Tommy's family moved from Gary, Indiana, to 2913 Cleveland Street in Hammond, which had been Shep's home several years earlier. Tommy served in the U.S. Navy during WWII (1943-46) as a Motor Machinist's Mate 3rd class (MoMM3c), and was onboard the aircraft carrier USS Sable as she was being decommissioned in the fall of 1945. After the war, he worked for many years at Inland Steel, rising to foreman. Tommy was twice married, first to Lois Marie Baars shortly after his Navy discharge, then on July 1, 1965, to Donna Jean Young. Tommy was in fact very musically inclined. He played many instruments and often performed solo and in local bands. He was especially noted for his vocal rendition of "Old Shep," which was said to bring crowds of listeners to tears. Tommy died in Cedar Lake, Indiana, on November 18, 1996, survived by Donna and two children (Thomas and Terri Rae). He was interred at Chapel Lawn Memorial Cemetery, Schererville, Indiana.

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Shep's mother -- Anne (aka Anna and Annie) (nee Heinrichs) Shepherd Hetrick (1899-1977) -- had four sisters, one of which was Kathryn Edith ("Aunt Kate") Heinrichs (1896-1989). She was married to Alfred August ("Uncle Al") Von Beulwitz (1895-1968), who worked as a musician (violinist) and orchestra leader. They had three children (Shep's cousins): Joyce Gloria (m. Jerome Albert De Berthier) (1920-2006), Arline (aka Arlene) Hope (m. Willis L. Bennett) (1922-?) and Alfred August Jr. (1923-1992).

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[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] During the latter half of his WOR broadcast of February 26, 1964, Shep talks about his involvement with a local radio station while in high school. However, most of the story relates to classmate "Bobby," who Shep said came behind him in the alphabet and would be called "Bobby Watanabe" for the purposes of the story. Shep went into much detail about Bobby, saying he had only one talent, and that was for "operating." For example, Bobby was a mediocre student, but got good grades because he knew how to handle the teachers. When Bobby learned that Shep, with whom he rarely spoke, had a little radio show, he got Shep to introduce him to the station's program director, Sam Weller. Soon, Bobby -- though only in high school -- was nighttime supervisor at the station, taking Weller's office. Bobby was a "little monster" reorganizing the station, after having discussed his plans with "Mr. Richardson," the station's manager. Bobby even told their history teacher, "Mr. Wilson," how to run his school radio program on the station. Bobby also gave written assignments to Shep, signing the notes "W." However, according to Shep, Bobby had a "high squeaky voice, totally unsuited for radio or any known form of performing." Jumping forward in time, Shep said he was in the army and saw that Bobby was named "Young Man of the Year" in Guts Magazine at age 19 and that he managed the biggest talent agency in Hollywood. When Shep was out of the army and going to college on the GI Bill, he saw that Bobby would be giving a lecture sponsored by the Commerce Club in the school's main auditorium. Shep attended and tried to speak to him there, but Bobby had little time for Shep, saying he had to catch a flight to the "Coast," where he remains (as of the time of the 1964 broadcast). ********************************************************************* Robert Brent "Bobby" Weiss was born on June 10, 1921, in Indiana to Joseph and Wilma Weiss, who had immigrated from Hungary shortly before WWI. The family lived on Calumet Avenue in Hammond, where they also ran Weiss Department Store. Bobby attended the town's public schools, including Hammond High, with Shep. Bobby was apparently quite popular and active in numerous high school activities, including being sports editor on the school paper and manager for the football team. While in high school, Bobby also worked at local radio station WWAE, where he served as assistant program director and had his own popular show called "Matinee Request Time." One fawning article in The Hammond Times in June 1939 had this to say about Bobby, "If you're an Horatio Alger fan you'll be interested in following the meteoric career of one Robert Weiss who just this June grabbed off his diploma from Hammond High. Little Bobby grabbed off even better things long ago. . . . The little man has much further to go than that." Soon after graduation with Shep, Bobby moved to Hollywood, where he worked at Warner Brothers radio station KFWB, and became friendly with Glenn Wallichs, a co-founder of Capitol Records. By 1941, Bobby had become publicity and promotions manager for Horace Heidt, a popular bandleader, entertainer and media executive of the time. He also wrote record reviews for Hollywood magazines. Bobby then enlisted in the US Army Air Corps on November 7, 1942, at Randolph Field in Texas. He was discharged in 1945 after the war, and promptly resumed his career in Hollywood. By the end of the year, young Bobby was national publicity director for Capitol Records. A year later, he was West Coast director of Musicraft Records, where he handled recording stars like Artie Shaw and Mel Torme. By 1947, Bobby had his own public relations firm, which represented clients such as Rhonda Fleming, Jackie Gleason, Patti Page and Woody Herman. By 1952, Bobby had returned to Capitol Records, becoming its European director for four years, and moved to Paris, which he would call home for a dozen years. In 1956, Bobby became international manager of E. H. Morris Music Co. Two years later he was named director of the international division of Warner Brothers Records. By early 1966, Bobby was vice president and West Coast director of Monument Records. In 1973, Bobby started his own One World of Music consultancy for record companies and music publishers, which he operated for several decades. Bobby passed away on September 16, 2010, in Granada Hills, California. He was married several times, once to French actress Martine (aka Marthou) Ascarateil in December 1957. They divorced about twelve years later.

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Steve Glazer - - ] Frank Zudock -- born on October 24, 1898 (or 1897), either in Italy or Czechoslovakia (the birthplace of his parents) -- lived at 3609 Deodar Street in East Chicago, Indiana. On June 13, 1925, he married Mary P. Sablich. A son, Frank Jr., was born a year later, followed by Pauline, Mary and Frances. For many years, Zudock worked with Shep's father at the Borden-Wieland Division of the Borden dairy company in Hammond, variously holding positions as driver, milkman, salesman, and assistant foreman. Zudock died in November 1981.

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[ Courtesy: Pete Delaney - - ] The first image we see of Jean Shepherd in the series finds the 49 year old humorist in familiar territory - the Inland Steel Company mill just south of Chicago where he worked in 1938 and 1939. Standing amid the fire and brimstone of the raging #3 open hearth, the host cheerfully cackles like the Devil and announces "Welcome to my pad! This is why I will always identify with Mephisto!" Then in off-screen narration for the rest of the show, Shep accompanies fascinating visuals of the huge foundry in action. "When you look back at a specific time in your life" Shepherd says, "you remember specific bits and pieces instead of solitary things." The bits that the master-story teller recalls include how this huge city-within-a-city was a surreal world of incredible visuals and wild sounds, where it was always either blazingly hot of bitter cold. Where each part of the mill was different from the other, each section smelling like an exotic oil. Where the ground of the mill never stopped shaking and where spectacular colors were viewed behind the scratched lenses of safety goggles. Where the simple sight of coils of blue steel created an unnoticed natural sculpture and locomotives endlessly pulled hot and cold cars throughout a maze of tracks. Where horns were always blaring and things were always heard breaking. On a personal level, Shep recalled how great it was to buy a new pair of safety shoes ('peasant', 'sport' or 'dress' styles.) He also remembers great moments of ecstasy such as drinking an ice cold Coke after "hours in the number five soaking pit have cooked all the juice out of you." or punching out at the clockhouse on the last day of your work week. Shep also recalls moments of terror such as the time a hopper car full of molten steel tipped over destroying a work shed in a matter of seconds or when Jean almost fell down a metal ladder to certain doom. The grand finale in the show's last 5 minutes features the astonishing "tapping of the heat" where molten steel that has been cooking for hours is poured out from the furnace, lighting up the mill with a hell like glow and a horrid sound and unavailing "The Phantom of the Open Hearth" the frightening simulated face of a giant woman formed by the huge machinery involved in "tapping the heat." Fans of Jean Shepherd's radio show loved every moment and eagerly awaited the next dozen episodes. Critics however were mixed. In Philadelphia there were two views: "One of the best things on TV this year. Fantastic photography, poetry, humor, excitement and enjoyment. There was never any doubt about the realities of mill life that Shepherd, a man in love with life and experiences easily transcended. Shepherd has the humor, the philosophy and perspective to praise virtues as well as faults of the land and it's people. A lot of people are going to identify with Jean Shepherd's America." ... Rex Policer, Philadelphia Evening Bulletin. "Jean Shepherd's America got off to a dreary start with a steel mill show that's impossible for the average American to identify with. It was like watching a 30 minute stale industrial publicity film." ... Harry Harris, Philadelphia Inquirer. Shepherd responded to these reviews by simply saying "They're both right."

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[ Courtesy: Pete Delaney - - ] "I suppose some people's version of heaven is a super Howard Johnson's with no line for the rest rooms. Mine is a fast moving stream." The fast moving stream that Jean casts his fly rod into is the Skowhegan branch of Kennebec River in the state of Maine. Shep explains that not only is this stream his heaven, but it's his Oz, his Samarcand, his Timbuktu, his Wonderland, his Khartoum and his mystical kingdom. It's a desire for a woodland paradise born from growing up in "Always cloudy, always smoky industrial Northern Indiana, where the refineries smelled like rotten cabbages, and the most exotic sound to be heard was the clack of pool balls down at the Bluebird Tavern." This was the world he once only knew in the pages of Field & Stream magazine whose photos and articles prompted his eventual mantra of "Maine! There is a Maine! And one day, I'm going there." But for all the pristine beauty surrounding Shep as he casts, the humorist can't resist telling one of his funniest stories dealing with fishing at its grimiest "Hairy Gertz & The 47 Crappies", a raunchy tale of grizzled office workers (including Shepherd's father) and 10 year old Jean fishing for the aptly named fish in Cedar Lake - America's biggest polluted mud puddle. The story ends with bleary-eyed, mosquito bite covered Shep gutting and cleaning the 47 stinky fish on his back porch before joining the adults for pastrami sandwiches and dirty stories in the kitchen at 4:30 AM. The show features magnificent vistas of Maine scenery and includes a visit to the 1970 Skowhegan fair. The show also gives us an unpleasant look at the sexist side of Jean Shepherd as he foolishly implies that women don't fish, don't drink, don't fell dirty stories or don't even read adventure books borrowed from the library as a kid.

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Pete Delaney - - ] In this episode's opening off-screen monologue Jean strongly states his personal beliefs: "Got to get away!" "We're migratory!" "We've gotta go!" "Got to find a new way-to live!" Jean finds a perfect venue to promote these ideas as he heads west on the last run of Union Pacific's passenger train between Chicago and Los Angeles in 1970. As -the train rolls through the American wilderness there's another classic story to be told. It's an Army tale of newly drafted Shepherd pulling KP duty(oatmeal server) on a troop train barreling through the Ozarks. After the Hellish detail is over, Shep relates how a soldier named Ernie ended up disappearing from the train in the wilds of Arkansas because of a quest for beer.-This prompts Shep's poetic (but ultimately not truthful) statement at the finale of the episode "We are all part of a crowd of shadowy Ernie's who miss every train in the night of the American soul."

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Pete Delaney - - ] Since Alaska never changes, there is a timeless quality in what is probably the best episode of the series. This exploration of the 49th state includes the expected spectacular, awe-inspiring scenic beauty, but through the wit and humor of Jean Shepherd we have so much more in a particularly special half hour. Throughout the show we hear excepts from the poetry of Yukon legend Robert W. Service and music from both Vaughan Williams' "Antarctic Symphony" and a rowdy New Jersey Dixieland ensemble named "The Sons of the Whiskey Rebellion." There's examples of rugged iconoclasts "That's Herb Engstrom's gold dredge. He's scooping up gold out of Basin Creek, 15 miles just off the Nome River. He's been digging gold in the same creek now for almost 40 years. He's 86. There's a man. Look at that. Herb Engstrom says 'That's real eatin' dirt!'" Or: "That's Kitter Bill's tent, a real prospector. If you want to visit him, you had better bring a bottle of whiskey. He's out there tonight." There are unique visuals such as the stark beauty of a town of weather beaten cabins, the eerie sight of a huge abandoned airplane and the bustling activity of the Eskimo fishing village of Kotzebu. Shepherd interviews crusty Nome newspaper editor Albro B. Gregory about the merits of fistfights, drunks and the cold and looks in on some hunters engaged in target practice. In two hilarious segments Shepherd challenges nature and comes out second best both times. First, he bodily assaults the Mendenhall Glacier in Tongass National Forest ("I've found something bigger than me! What a drag this thing is!") only to be heard screaming for help off-screen as he disappears into the river. Later, he searches for gold nuggets along the shore of the Berinbg Sea but only finds a Ked tennis shoe, an empty can of tuna, an empty can of tobacco, an empty jar of hair tonic, an empty can of evaporated milk and empty bottles of Pepsi and 7UP. At the end of the episode, Shepherd relishes the silence of Arctic tundra ("I wish I could take 50 cubic yards of this silence back to 6th Avenue in Manhattan!"). He then decides to chuck it all to become a man of the frozen north and disappear into the tundra forever, a fate much better than having to deal with" ... wars, fistfights( the New York Mets and commercials for Right Guard. Good-bye cruel world, I've had enough of ya!" Shep then walks off over the permafrost. After a few seconds we hear him say "Hey, there's a beer can, here." as the picture fades out to the sound of both a Vaughan Williams chorus and a biting wind.

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Pete Delaney - - ] Jean Shepherd believes that Americans are one of the most inscrutable, mysterious nationalities in the world. And one way to figure out the mystery of what it is to be an American is through the stomach. So Shep shows us our food like it's rarely been seen on TV before. Loving, lingering close-ups of rocky mountain rainbow trout, Virginia pecan pie, New England baked beans, deep candied sweet potatoes, fancy hogs-head cheese, Maine lobster, Klondike bear stew - the list goes on and on. A "beautiful refrigerator", seen alone on a dark set, flings it's magic door open to the sound of a string quartet as Shep recites rarely heard food poetry. The highlight of this salute to gluttony is Jean's dismantling of a Maine lobster - "When it's floating around it's just another crustacean. When it reaches your plate, it's a work of art." A C&W musical interlude follows ("Fried chicken and a country tune, they go together like a moon in June ... ") and the show ends with the fridge getting a huge ovation.

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Pete Delaney - - ] A very peaceful episode as Jean Shepherd pilots an empty houseboat around the Gulf of Mexico ("This boat sleeps six. I get to pick the other five.") amid gorgeous aquatic scenery. Paraphrasing Robinson Crusoe and offering recollections of a childhood comic book hero who escapes the bad guys with a unique watercraft the show ends with Shep finding the deserted island of his dreams.

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Mark Anderson - - ] My Dad was in the signal corps. He ended up at Half Moon Bay in Northern California, which he actually liked. If you read the letter, you can tell that he was not a fan of army life. He often told the story of the time he went to see a movie at the local theater and during the movie there was an earthquake. He was impressed by how calm the people were as they cleared the theater. He also told that he looked back and saw the balcony support beams swaying dramatically back and forth. He was sure they would collapse.

Notes:

[ Courtesy: Pete Delaney - - ] Turkish prostitutes form union How much a woman costs in Port Moresby When women get equal pay with men they get equally drunk TV's obsession with lions Guinea Pigs, Hamsters and Gerbils Deadly Birds VISTA PSA Theft of all the furniture at a radio station The theft of radio station equipment by 3 guys desperate to be on the air Theft of a Broadway show prop Theft of a TV show microphone

Notes:

Notes
This is the first hour from an episode of the 9:05pm to 1:00am shows Shep did. Since it was recorded with a 'live mike' in front of a radio, you can hear background noises from the household, and even an old propeller airplane flying overhead, adding to the nostalgia.
Commercials
Not Determined yet
Music
None Listed
None on record
Engineer and other Staff in Booth
Not Determined
Summary/Rating Credit
By: Jim Clavin
Date: -
Rating: Not Rated
Instruments Played
Unknown
Airdate History ' - Original' date is earliest known broadcast)
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